Easy indoor plant seeds



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Easy indoor plant seeds?

I started growing houseplants indoors and have a great, diverse collection of tropical/fruiting plants. I have a problem with some of them, so I am looking for solutions. Here is my problem:

I have several plants which are not fruiting, or they are fruiting very rarely (usually once every 3 years). For instance, one of them, a cactus like plant (not the spiny kind), never produces any fruit. The others, like basil, can be expected to produce once or twice a year, and are very prone to getting mold problems.

Is there anything that I can add to my growing environment to help the indoor plants get their full benefit of the sun? I mean the plants which I am referring to need at least 5 hours of direct sunlight (the indoor plant lights just simulate sunlight). I already know about the necessity of having a humid, and cool environment and I do. The reason I am asking is because I do not want the indoor plants to be miserable (like the poor basil plants) and I do not want them to be too much sun (like the tropical ones), just what they need.

Can you grow plants indoors that do not require a lot of sun? That I can grow only 5 hours a day, or just 3 or 4 hours (maybe during the summer or in the winter if they are inside)?

Is there anything that I can do to help the indoor plants produce more fruit?

There are some seeds out there that are advertised to be "indoor-growing". These generally germinate quicker, and are more likely to produce roots. It also seems that it is just a matter of whether the seed will get its roots "stuck" in the mix, which is not ideal. Is there any good evidence that this sort of approach works, or is it just advertising hype?

That depends upon the seed type. Some seeds can survive in the cold, but that can be a problem for many plants. Plants that are sold as "indoor plants" will generally be germinated in a cold frame or indoors, but they can be direct seeded, without having any kind of protection from cold, and they will sprout just fine. If you seed them directly in the garden, or a small plot, they will usually go back to your indoor plant after a month or so, or will go to other plants. Those "indoor plants" sold as cold tolerant generally start from seed and will sprout at the first sign of spring. There are also seeds for those "indoor plants" that do need light, but the seedlings take a little longer to emerge than if they were started in a cold frame. Once the seedlings have a good root system, then they can be planted outside.

I don't know the best approach for cold-tolerant plants. They will start indoors, then just need to go outside at first. I think the best approach is to just start plants where you want them, then give them a little more room and grow them as they need it, so they don't become "too big for their britches."

I found it interesting that both of you have said that cold tolerance is not really a trait we should emphasize.

I think it is. It is a trait that is of interest to many gardeners, and it might be of interest to growers looking to market the plants. Most of my plants are cold-tolerant, for instance. I did my best to find plants with that trait, and I don't grow anything I can't grow in my garden. That means I can't grow many tropicals or perennials that can only be grown in cold frames.

I don't know the best approach for cold-tolerant plants. They will start indoors, then just need to go outside at first. I think the best approach is to just start plants where you want them, then give them a little more room and grow them as they need it, so they don't become "too big for their britches."

I found it interesting that both of you have said that cold tolerance is not really a trait we should emphasize.

To be honest, the cold tolerance of this variety is not a trait we should emphasize, as I mentioned in my reply to the OP.

Cold tolerance is good, but there are a bunch of other characteristics that are even better, such as root structure, resistance to pests, etc. The fact that most of the plants here don't fit into your description of "cold-tolerant" (other than a few plants with thick, cold hardy, succulent leaves) does not mean that cold tolerance is not something to look for.

I think, in reality, our biggest problem in cold tolerant planting is that we just haven't used enough of the available varieties in the past. I don't think we will see the "big change" in winter growing because we are so used to one style. I think the next big change will come when we see hybrids with some cold tolerance.

The most commonly available cold hardy perennials are really just plants that can grow in a variety of climates. Not surprisingly, plants with cold hardy foliage are generally resistant to freezing temperatures as well as to hot temperatures. Unfortunately, most of the varieties on the market today fall short of the "can grow in many climates" category, so cold tolerance in general is not a trait we should emphasize.

If your goal is to provide the best winter growing experience for yourself and your family, then you should start looking for varieties that fall into a couple of categories:

First, you want plants that can be grown with your minimum winter protection (e.g. they need at least some protection). You want varieties that are cold hardy (can survive in low temperatures) and tolerant of a moderate number of freezing events (can survive through freezing temperatures and a few below-freezing freezes). You also want plants that are not very susceptible to winter injury, so be careful with those that look frost tolerant.Winter injury can include a variety of things:

Bud break from cold

Brown leaf color from sub-freezing

Injured leaves

Mummification of flowers and fruit

The second category of plants that you may want to emphasize is hardiness by location. This means that you may not be able to grow a plant that you have in mind on your property because the best plants for that site are grown only in a certain type of soil or microclimate.

For example, you can have a number of good varieties of _Geranium sanguineum_ , including some cultivars that are highly cold tolerant. I have seen plants that have survived a number of sub-freezing temperatures in the past few years and have been in the protected greenhouse the whole time. But most of the _Geranium_ seedlings that I buy for my landscapes are geraniums that are intended to be grown outdoors in colder areas. Most are geraniums that are grown for a short summer season and are sold as early flowering geraniums. You can get some of the geraniums that I am talking about at local garden centers. And many of them are available at your home and garden center, the nursery of your choice, or on the Internet.

#### **MISSISSIPPI RIVER GARDENER**

If you want to spend a lot of time working in your garden, you may find that it is convenient to buy a raised bed with a low, sloping north-facing side that you can use to grow plants. This raised bed can have a built-in watering system that allows you to water it whenever needed. You also



Comments:

  1. Laureano

    In it something is. Thanks for council how I can thank you?

  2. Turn

    All this just the convention, no more

  3. Modig

    Between us speaking, you did not try to look in google.com?

  4. Tauzuru

    This feature will not work in all industries.

  5. Fauhn

    I apologize, but I need more information.



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